Commerce and Conflict; Wilmington, Fort Fisher and Blockade Running During the Civil War

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​​The Historical Society of Topsail Island (HSTI) invites you to lunch with our exciting speaker, John William Morris III, MA, RPA (aka Billy Ray) at our April Luncheon.  Morris explores Wilmington during the American Civil War, one of the most important ports in the Confederacy.  With two approaches into the Cape Fear River Wilmington rapidly became the pivotal port for the importation of supplies and munitions for the Army of Northern Virginia.

The Underwater Archaeology Branch of the Office of State Archaeology has recorded 27 shipwrecks from vessels involved in the campaign to close the port of Wilmington from 1861-1865.


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The program is set for April 13, 2017, 11:30 am at the Historic Assembly Building, 720 Channel Blvd. in Topsail Beach.  Lunch is catered by The Beach Shop and Grill and the menu will include BBQ chicken, mac & cheese, baked beans, salad, rolls, dessert, and iced tea. The lunch is $13 and is payable at the door.  Attendees ages 70 and older pay only $11 per lunch. There is no charge for attending the program only.  RSVP to hstiluncheons@gmail.com or call 910-389-8776 by 6pm Sunday April 9th. Guarantee

​​Currently, Morris serves as the Deputy State Archaeologist-Underwater for the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, Office of State Archaeology. In this capacity he directs the Queen Anne’s Revenge Project, the complete recordation, recovery, and interpretation of the Blackbeard’s flagship, lost in 1718 in Beaufort Inlet. He is also responsible for the preservation of North Carolina’s maritime heritage through the protection, investigation, and public interpretation of over 4000 other shipwrecks present in state waters.


By |2019-05-01T12:26:10-05:00March 27th, 2017|Luncheons, March 2017|0 Comments

THE BIG DIG: A History of the Intracoastal Waterway in New Hanover County

Join Us Thursday March 9th from 11:30am to 1:00pm at The Historic Assembly Building

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​Want to know more about how the Intracoastal Waterway made its way through North Carolina?  Join HSTI and Elaine B. Henson for “The Big Dig: A History of the Intracoastal Waterway in New Hanover County”.  Lunch, catered by The Beach Shop and Grill will be corned beef and cabbage with potatoes and carrots, salad, rolls, dessert and tea.  There is no charge for the program only, but please register to guarantee your seat!Elaine Blackwell Henson is presently the President of the Federal Point Historic Preservation Society.  She has served as a past president of the Cape Fear Garden Club,  past chairman of Azalea Garden Tour and has served on the board of the Historical Society of the Lower Cape Fear.  Her book, “A Postcard History: Carolina Beach”, grew out of her love and curiosity of vintage photographs and has led to many historic articles in local magazines.


By |2019-05-01T12:24:09-05:00March 2nd, 2017|Luncheons, March 2017|0 Comments

What Happened to the Lost Colony?

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What Happened to the Lost Colony? Join David LaVere, Ph.D. from the North Carolina Humanities Council at the Historical Society of Topsail Island’s February Luncheon to explore this mystery!   

Catered by the Beach Shop and Grill- So you know lunch will be great!  Penne Pasta with Meatballs, salad, rolls, dessert and tea. 

Space is limited so be sure to Register Soon!

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​The Lost Colony is one of the great NC mysteries. History professor Dr. David LaVere’s research shows that when the English colonists who were left on Roanoke in 1587 disappeared, they tried to leave clues to their whereabouts. Though John Smith and others would look for them, the Lost Colonists were never seen again by Europeans. Their fate terrified the English and had the potential to derail future English colonization. This talk explains Roanoke Indian society and politics, English Elizabethan politics and colonial ambitions, who and what made the Roanoke colony fail, and what LaVere believes happened to the Lost Colonists.


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David LaVere, Ph. D.
Professor of History at UNC Wilmington, freelance writer, authorProf. David La Vere teaches American Indian History at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. He is an award-winning author and public speaker. Born in New Orleans, he served a hitch as a Marine Corps infantryman, then earned a B.A. in Journalism from Northwestern State University in Natchitoches, Louisiana. Upon graduation, he spent five years in Dallas as an advertising copywriter. Discovering he enjoyed writing history more than writing ad copy, he returned to Northwestern State and earned an MA in History, From there he went on to Texas A&M University for his Ph.D. in History. He came to UNC Wilmington in 1993 and is now a professor of history there. La Vere has just finished his seventh book, titled The Tuscarora War: Indians, Settlers and the Fight for the Carolina Colonies, and published in October 2013 by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Press. Besides books, he’s written numerous articles for Our State North Carolina magazine and for


By |2019-05-01T12:28:47-05:00January 24th, 2017|January 2017, Luncheons|0 Comments

A Tale of Two Sarahs – March 2016 Luncheon

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The 18th century was not an easy time to be an indentured servant. Meet two women who refused to accept their lot in life and forged their own destinies through cunning, lies and deception.

​Learn about the characters and cultures that populated Tryon Palace and the surrounding areas of New Bern throughout history. If you have toured Tryon Palace you may be familiar with topics like the Stanly family and 18th-century dining culture, but these lunches will take you deeper into the history of the palace and the people of historic New Bern.

The March luncheon of the Historical Society of Topsail Island will be held at the Assembly Building on Thursday, March 10, 2016, at 11:30 AM.  Mr. Matt Arthur, Living History Program Coordinator at Tryon Palace, will share the history of indentured servants in NC during the late 17th and 18th centuries.


Lunch, prepared by The Beach Shop, will include:
Corned Beef with Cabbage, Potatoes, Carrots
Salad, rolls, dessert and tea

Remember that reservations are required for the luncheon.  There is no charge for attending the program only.  Cost is $12 ($10 for attendees 70+) to be paid at the door.

RSVP to hstiluncheons@gmail.com or call 910-389-8776 by Friday, March 4th.


By |2019-05-01T12:30:43-05:00February 22nd, 2016|February 2016, Luncheons|0 Comments

March Luncheon

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The March luncheon of the Historical Society of Topsail Island will be held at the Assembly Building on Thursday, March 10, 2016, at 11:30 AM.  Mr. Matt Arthur, Living History Program Coordinator at Tryon Palace, will share the history of indentured servants in NC during the late 17th and 18th centuries.


Lunch, prepared by The Beach Shop, will include:
Corned Beef with Cabbage, Potatoes, Carrots
Salad, rolls, dessert and tea

Remember that reservations are required for the luncheon.  There is no charge for attending the program only.  Cost is $12 ($10 for attendees 70+) to be paid at the door.

RSVP to hstiluncheons@gmail.com or call 910-389-8776 by Friday, March 4th.


By |2019-05-01T12:33:50-05:00February 17th, 2016|Luncheons|0 Comments

February 2016 speaker: Mayor Eulis Willis

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Mayor Eulis Willis has served over 36 years within the town council with the last 14 years as Mayor. Four year term starting 2013 through 2017.
 

The February luncheon of the Historical Society of Topsail Island will be held at the Assembly Building on Thursday, February 11, 2016, at 11:30 AM. The Mayor of Navassa, Mr. Eulis Willis, who attended and spoke at our 2015 meeting on the Gullah/Geechee Corridor, will discuss the history of the area’s rice plantations and share details of local rice production.
Lunch, prepared by The Beach Shop, will include: Penne Pasta with Meatballs, Green Beans, Salad, rolls, dessert and tea.
Remember that reservations are required for the luncheon. There is no charge for attending the program only. Cost is $12 ($10 for attendees 70+) to be paid at the door.
RSVP to hstiluncheons@gmail.com or call 910-389-8776 by Friday, February 5th.

Navassa The Town and its People

Check out our book written by the Mayor himself!
Written by the Mayor, himself!

Article in North Brunswick Magazine Spring 2014: http://www.northbrunswickmagazine.com/Blog/78002/Eulis-A-Willis-Mayor-of-Navassa-Working-for-the-People

http://www.coastalreview.org/2014/10/african-roots-brunswick-county
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By |2019-05-01T12:35:20-05:00February 6th, 2016|February 2016, Luncheons|0 Comments